Sleeping In Airports

I really dislike airport sleeping. Really dislike it. That’s not to say I haven’t been forced to catch up on much needed slumber on an airport layover. There was that time my flight landed in Singapore after midnight and I (exhausted because I don’t sleep in the cozy confines of budget coach airplanes) inadvertently wandered into the no exit, chairless holding pen for the next leg of my flight to Nepal and spent the ensuing seven hours sleeping on the cold tile floor. Alone. Clutching my backpack. Then there was the time I got kicked out of both the closed Burger King and closed McDonalds in the Beijing airport because I tried to catch some shuteye on their plastic benches during a nine hour overnight layover. And the time I missed my connection in the Istanbul airport and though it has a handy airport hotel for which I would have gladly paid their exorbitant price to lie flat on a bed, the connecting flight they re-booked me on kept getting delayed. Throughout the night, the agent regularly warned passengers to stay in the area because it could depart at any time. Nine hours of dozing while caffeinated later, I finally boarded the plane. These were not experiences I had in my supple-bodied twenties. No. They happened in my AARP subscribing years when tile floor and Burger King beds do a number on you.

That’s why I was so thrilled to find the website Sleeping In Airports.

The website shares timely information submitted by passengers organized by individual airport guides from all over the world on everything you need to know if stuck on a long layover. It also lists best and worst airports rated by actual customers. For example, about my home airport, SeaTac in Seattle it says:

  • Since this is a 24 hour airport, you can stay in the secure/airside area at night.
  • Several reviewers warned of loud TVs and announcements, even late at night, so earplugs are recommended if you want to sleep.
  • Airside – Most of the seats in Seattle airport are partitioned by armrests. However, there are long, padded benches that are nice for sleeping around Gate A14 or near the end of Concourse C (Gate 10). Avoid C9 and C17, as there are a lot of TVs in the area. The S concourse has padded benches near the center of the terminal.
  • Eye shades may come in handy as some areas tend to be bright at night.
  • There are lots of soft black seats with NO arms at the Southwest Airlines B8 gate!! (Juju – August 2016)
  • Landside – There is a meditation room on the 2nd level of the main terminal that offers peace, quiet, and comfy benches. Beyond that, places to sleep are limited.
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Amsterdam Airport Library

I’m flying to Estonia via Amsterdam in a few weeks and was thrilled to find both the Amsterdam and the Tallin, Estonia Airports on the website’s Top Ten List of Best Airports in Europe. Tallin is #3 and Amsterdam is #9. Both airports have comfortable plush sleeping chairs and libraries and the Tallin Airport has the added bonus of announcements performed by jazz and opera singers. Imagine that. No echoing nasal voiced announcements but rather the melodious voices of vocal artists reminding me that I need to get out of my plush sleeping chair to catch my flight home.

Amsterdam Houseboat: Living Like A Local

There are sixty miles of canals in Amsterdam; 165 waterways that thread their way through the city defining its geography, its history, and your social status if you were lucky enough to live on or near one in recent history. The city’s canal system, built by draining swamps and creating canals in concentric arcs, was a model of urban planning for its time, earning the Canal District a place on UNESCO’s World Heritage list in 2010.

Most visitors to Amsterdam are content to wander the canals by foot or bike, crossing over any number of the city’s 1500 bridges, snapping photos of picturesque flower boxes and historic, gabled Dutch buildings. Or, they take a canal tour on the hop-on hop-off boats and private tour boats that wind the canal network. But it’s also possible to live like an Amsterdammer by staying in a houseboat vacation rental where you have an up-close opportunity to watch the city’s watery highway system at work and play. And if traveling solo, your options for finding an affordable houseboat rental are even greater.

Read more of my article published in Solo Travel Network here.

A Message From Van Gogh

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View of the Sea at Scheveningen

During my recent week in Amsterdam I wandered through five museums; four in Amsterdam and one in de Hague. I had a vague understanding of the Dutch painters, but seeing their work up close in Dutch museums is completely breathtaking.

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Dutch master and Post-Impressionist painter Vincent Willem van Gogh has an entire Amsterdam museum built in 1973 devoted to his works and that of his contemporaries conveniently located a 10 minute walk from my houseboat accommodation.

In 2002 thieves scaled the Van Gogh Museum wall, smashed a window, evaded the security system and stole two works of art including View of the Sea at Scheveningen, one of only two Dutch seascapes painted by Van Gogh. While the thieves were caught in 2004, the paintings were never recovered until the news broke of their recovery while I was in Amsterdam. According to Smithsonian.com the theft was linked to the Camorra crime syndicate in Naples. This wasn’t the first time a Van Gogh museum theft occurred. In 1991 twenty paintings were stolen from the museum and recovered 35 minutes later in an abandoned car.

I attempted to sketch the mural side of the Van Gogh Museum when I was there and gave up feeling not at all up to the task. Returning home a quote from Van Gogh popped up on my Facebook feed; a message I wished he would have delivered in that moment of intimidation that discouraged me from pressing on with my drawing.

“If you hear a voice within you saying, “You are not a painter”, then by all means paint….and that voice will be silenced.”

 

Dutch Shoes

In Gulliver’s Travels, author Jonathon Swift’s character, Gulliver found himself a giant on the island of Lilliput in the South Indian Ocean which was inhabited by tiny people 1/12th the size of regular humans. As a tall woman, I’m often aware of my height when I travel. In certain countries I feel like Gulliver.

But there are other places in the world where I don’t stand out – places where the people grow tall and sturdy and our eyes meet on the same plane when passing on the street. I’m often asked if I’m Dutch when I travel so finding myself with a week to spare when transiting through Amsterdam this past month I decided to spend it among my tall peers. And to test the mettle of the height accepting Netherlands, I went shoe shopping. It’s one thing to grow your people taller, but do you offer them size appropriate footwear?

I once thought Paris would be my shoe nirvana. Its an epicenter of the fashion world. Tall, lithe women grace their streets and wear the most fashionable shoes going about their daily business. They bike in stiletto heels and sip wine at outdoor cafes in high leather boots. It was Frenchwomen who popularized the ballet flat as a global trend.  But when I walked into shoe stores in Paris, saleswomen would look at my feet, purse their lips and, with a note of pity in their voice, inform me that they never carry shoes in my size. Never. Jamias. One place pointed me to a store in the Republique district of the city with a backroom that had a single dusty shelf of black oxfords. The same thing happened in Switzerland. There the salesman eventually found a pair of bright pink Sketchers in my size. In Spain I was forced to buy men’s Nikes for an unexpected hiking trip.

Amsterdam would surely be different. The Dutch, who come from a Germanic ethnic group, became the tallest Europeans in the 1980s, a dramatic turnaround from their former status in the first half of the 19th century as the shortest Europeans. Smithsonian Magazine as well as other researchers claim the reason is natural selection. In theory I should be able to walk into a Dutch shoe store and inquire about shoes without the look of pity I got elsewhere. My first stop was a mild success. The saleswoman had some styles in my size but she recommended that I check out a store called Caland/Schoen that specialized in fashionable larger sizes for women and men.

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Caland/Schoen is shoe heaven for anyone who has experienced the look of pity from shoe salespeople; the look that says, “Your feet are gargantuan”. There was an entire room of shoes in my size. Snappy red ankle boots, breezy navy ballet flats, stylish multi-toned heels, flattering European styles and not a single dusty black oxford on the shelves. It’s a self service store if you choose to not ask for help. I gushed about the variety and sheer volume of shoes in my size and the friendly saleswoman left me alone for two hours happily trying on all sorts of styles. I bought a pair of stylish black veterschoen and had I had more room in my suitcase and on my credit card, I would have come home with much more.

The owner of Caland/Schoen, Anke Griffioen, is a woman with a taste for fashionable footwear who had difficulty finding shoes in her size. She opened up her first Caland/Shoen store in Rotterdam and eventually a second storefront in Amsterdam. Calend/Schoen also has an online store.

Amsterdam Store: Bilderdijkstraat 66 (trams 12, 13, 14)

Rotterdam Store: New Shortcuts 14