India: Monsoon Floods and Dengue Fever

It was only two months ago that I blogged about how the impoverished families involved in our humanitarian project in India were suffering from heat and drought. Fields had dried up. Drinking water was being brought in by the government. And family members were suffering from medical conditions brought on by living in tiny windowless concrete rooms that function like an oven in those conditions. It particularly impacted the town of Khajuraho and our families there from the farming caste – next to the lowest in India’s still functioning caste system. The India Group project paid for medical care, bottled water and rent for one of our displaced families in addition to our other regular education and health funding work.

Then the monsoon season arrived and excessive rainfall over the past week has caused the Ganges River and its tributaries to flood impacting our families who live in Varanasi. The families we support there are from the boatmen caste whose entire livelihood depends on the Ganges river.

India flooding

Today’s edition of The International Business Times reports:

Officials said at least 17 people have died in Madhya Pradesh, 14 in Bihar and nine in Uttar Pradesh over the weekend because of drowning, electrocution or injuries from collapsed houses. The Ganges flooded many residential areas of the city of Allahabad, forcing people to move to safer areas. About 12,000 people were evacuated from low-lying surrounding villages, a government statement said.

In the Hindu holy town of Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh, flooding forced a halt to cremations at a main riverfront area. Devout Hindus bring dead family members to Varanasi in the belief that being cremated there frees their soul from the cycle of death and rebirth. In Bihar, 600,000 people were evacuated and the army and air force are on standby because more rain is forecast, said a disaster management official.

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When I was in Varansi in February I joined a morning community yoga session at sunrise every day from this location now covered by Ganges flooding.

In Delhi where we also support a group of families, dengue fever has broken out in the slum where they live and several children and adults in our families have been hospitalized in the nearby Catholic hospital that works with our project providing medical care. Dengue fever is a mosquito transmitted disease and the standing water in the slums as well as humidity in Delhi make for prime breeding conditions for mosquito species who spread the disease.

It sometimes feels like nature is working against our families. As the experts have been predicting, it’s the most impoverished countries that will bear the brunt of climate change and within those countries the most impoverished of their citizens will be most susceptible.

If you wish to help, you can donate online at The India Group.

Author: anncrandall

My single parenthood has launched a successful son. My long-time, rewarding job has culminated in a modest retirement pension and evolved into part time consulting work. I made a list of all the times I said, "if only I had the time, I would..." . Prominent on the list were all the places I wanted to travel and getting more familiar with my home base. And so I am. I author two blogs: PeregrineWoman.com about my travels and ExplorationKitsap.com about where I live.

2 thoughts on “India: Monsoon Floods and Dengue Fever”

  1. Yup ! I agree….I get the Safeway brand call Caribou Carmel…..it also have chocolate covered caramel in it. In fact I bought two of them today 2 for $6.00. Can’t beat the price! I have already had two bowl of it since I came home about noon from shopping. We know how to live life right?

    Sent from my iPad

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