Estonia’s Singing Revolution

It was the power of choral singing that sustained the Estonian people during their fifty years behind The Iron Curtain. There are over 700 choirs in the tiny country of Estonia and from 1987 to 1991, the power of unified choir voices singing forbidden songs became a resistance tool in the country’s effort to gain independence. Check out my latest article in Global Comment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Washington’s Yakima Valley: A Dinosaur Herd and A Giant Teapot

Roadside attractions were popularized during the heyday of United States early, long distance, automobile travel. The back roads of the U.S. highway system are still littered with quirky tourist attractions thought up by the town leaders to convince the motoring public to visit and spend money – statues of flying saucers, tunnels through redwood trees, the world’s largest strawberry, largest yo-yo, largest Paul Bunyan statue, home of the world’s tallest man.

Washington State’s Yakima Valley may be better known as a wine destination, but it also has a giant teapot, the world’s only hop museum, a town full of murals and a growing herd of dinosaurs, all that can be checked out in my newest article in Northwest Travel and Life Magazine

The Ethnic Hat Museum of Riga, Latvia

Our museum started on a hot January night in 2002, when an intricate woman headdress was acquired at the Night market in the northern Thai city of Chiangmai. This woven hat, decorated by cowries, silver plates and Burmese coins, unexpectedly became the start of the huge collection of traditional headware which now encompasses over 400 items.

It was impossible to resist an intro like that. I’m a fan of small, single themed, well-curated museums having been regularly overwhelmed wandering through the bucket list museums of the world. I was in Riga, Latvia doing research for upcoming travel articles and its World of Ethnic Hats Museum sounded like a perfect addition to one of the articles.

Founded twelve years ago by Russian linguist, businessman and traveler, Kirill Babaev, he began by buying traditional ethnic clothing in his global travels and quickly realized the collection would be difficult to house. It made more sense to purchase only the headgear. When his collection outgrew his homes in Moscow and Jurmala, Latvia, Babaev moved it to four rooms of a second floor building in central Riga and opened a museum. I’d hoped to meet the founder when I visited, but he was in India searching for more hats. “We don’t know where we’ll put them,” laughed the museum curator.

The collection is organized by continent allowing visitors to study hats and headgear as an ethnographer might organize artifacts. Each hat has an informative multi-lingual explanation about its origin, use, age and composition. Many of them are accompanied by photos showing the original owner wearing traditional clothing and the hat.

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Most of the hats and headgear are only used for special occasions – festivals, weddings, and funerals. They’re intricate works of art usually, but not always, designed and handmade by women. In countries of colder climates, making hats and headgear was a winter activity for the summer festival and wedding season.

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The variety of size, shape and materials was astounding. Boiled wool, silk, grasses, plated metals and many were embellished with buttons, embroidery, bead work and feathers.

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When I posted this one among others on my Facebook page, it drew far more likes than any museum hat photos. That’s when I realized its similarity in shape to the pink pussy hat that I and millions of women wore during the January Women’s March.

The museum can be found at 7 Vilandes in Central Riga outside its medieval Old Town. A small sign at the entrance points you into a courtyard where you buzz the intercom to be let in and climb the stairs to the museum.

 

 

 

 

Volunteering at A Spanish Language School

A year ago I spent a week in March in at a resort in the mountains north of Madrid volunteering at a language school for Spanish professionals who wanted to improve their English. My accommodations, meals and transportation to and from the resort were provided. All I had to do was speak English. A year later I tell my friends I would have paid to have the experience. It was just that memorable. Our group still chats regularly on WhatsApp to keep up with each other. This week one of them blogged about it, providing me a memory do-over . I thought you’d enjoy her account.

The Difference Between Tapas & Pinchos

My fellow blogger Fork on the Road  “Travel Tips for Curious Cooks” has finally written the post I’ve been waiting for, the one that describes our evening of food grazing in Valencia, Spain sponsored by the Valencia tourism board. As he is a foodie and I’m not, the finer details of what we were eating were lost on me. I was there for the ambiance, history and company. He was there to learn about tapas, pinchos and how a traditional evening of eating and drinking unfolds for the average Valencian. He took photos of food. I took photos of the interior of the restaurant and people. He gets credit for the photo and I get to share his expertise with you.

Read his post here.

Sleeping In Airports

I really dislike airport sleeping. Really dislike it. That’s not to say I haven’t been forced to catch up on much needed slumber on an airport layover. There was that time my flight landed in Singapore after midnight and I (exhausted because I don’t sleep in the cozy confines of budget coach airplanes) inadvertently wandered into the no exit, chairless holding pen for the next leg of my flight to Nepal and spent the ensuing seven hours sleeping on the cold tile floor. Alone. Clutching my backpack. Then there was the time I got kicked out of both the closed Burger King and closed McDonalds in the Beijing airport because I tried to catch some shuteye on their plastic benches during a nine hour overnight layover. And the time I missed my connection in the Istanbul airport and though it has a handy airport hotel for which I would have gladly paid their exorbitant price to lie flat on a bed, the connecting flight they re-booked me on kept getting delayed. Throughout the night, the agent regularly warned passengers to stay in the area because it could depart at any time. Nine hours of dozing while caffeinated later, I finally boarded the plane. These were not experiences I had in my supple-bodied twenties. No. They happened in my AARP subscribing years when tile floor and Burger King beds do a number on you.

That’s why I was so thrilled to find the website Sleeping In Airports.

The website shares timely information submitted by passengers organized by individual airport guides from all over the world on everything you need to know if stuck on a long layover. It also lists best and worst airports rated by actual customers. For example, about my home airport, SeaTac in Seattle it says:

  • Since this is a 24 hour airport, you can stay in the secure/airside area at night.
  • Several reviewers warned of loud TVs and announcements, even late at night, so earplugs are recommended if you want to sleep.
  • Airside – Most of the seats in Seattle airport are partitioned by armrests. However, there are long, padded benches that are nice for sleeping around Gate A14 or near the end of Concourse C (Gate 10). Avoid C9 and C17, as there are a lot of TVs in the area. The S concourse has padded benches near the center of the terminal.
  • Eye shades may come in handy as some areas tend to be bright at night.
  • There are lots of soft black seats with NO arms at the Southwest Airlines B8 gate!! (Juju – August 2016)
  • Landside – There is a meditation room on the 2nd level of the main terminal that offers peace, quiet, and comfy benches. Beyond that, places to sleep are limited.
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Amsterdam Airport Library

I’m flying to Estonia via Amsterdam in a few weeks and was thrilled to find both the Amsterdam and the Tallin, Estonia Airports on the website’s Top Ten List of Best Airports in Europe. Tallin is #3 and Amsterdam is #9. Both airports have comfortable plush sleeping chairs and libraries and the Tallin Airport has the added bonus of announcements performed by jazz and opera singers. Imagine that. No echoing nasal voiced announcements but rather the melodious voices of vocal artists reminding me that I need to get out of my plush sleeping chair to catch my flight home.

Travel Planning During the Low Season: March in Estonia & Latvia

As a freelance travel writer I subscribe to a variety of websites promoting cheap airfares. My favorite being this one. In early December they promoted a $420 round trip ticket from Seattle to Tallin, Estonia on Delta Airlines. There was a reasonable layover in Amsterdam (one of my favorite layover airports) and the departure and arrival times were civilized. I left in the afternoon (instead of the wee hours of the morning necessitating shelling out money for a Seattle airport hotel the night before) and arrived early afternoon (which meant I could drop my bags at my hostel and not spend an entire day wandering the streets of Tallin trying to stay awake until bedtime).

The only catch was the round trip had to be completed by March 31, 2017. I booked the ticket for the last two weeks in March and then researched the weather in Estonia and Latvia for that time of year. My first clue was Rick Steves, that intrepid entrepreneur of all things travel (incidentally, his free and extensive travel book library in Edmonds, Washington is one of my favorite haunts). His Snapshot series book about Tallin assumes you’ll only be there in the summer strolling in the parks and outdoor markets, drinking coffee at an outdoor cafe. I checked Lonely Planet. “In March locals pull aside the curtains to check the weather outside….and yup, its still winter out there,” the writers pronounced in their saucy description of month by month climate. LP also assumes you’ll be visiting during the long, warm days of summer and gives little clue about travel in the low season. I deduced the northern latitude means daylight is still at a premium, many of the summer resorts are closed and museums and tourist attractions have limited hours.

Still….that air fare was so cheap and as I began to book accommodations, I discovered more advantages to off season travel. Without asking, the Tallin hostel upgraded me to a private larger room at no extra cost. A complementary tour of breweries in Riga, Latvia – free transportation and tasting included. Significantly discounted prices at Estonian and Latvian spas. Restaurant discounts. Tallin Music Week. In return all I had to do was pack more clothing layers and plan outdoor activities around shortened daylight hours. Packing and itinerary planning will be similar to my recent December Iceland trip which I posted about here and here.

I am, as I said, a freelance travel writer so this will be a working trip. There’ll be additional perks brokered by Estonia and Latvia’s helpful tourism agencies so I can write the articles already promised to editors: press passes to Tallin Music Week, interviews about Latvia’s Blue Cows, free entrance to the House of the Brotherhood of the Blackheads in Tallin and Riga and sites that have become part of both countries Soviet era tourism promotion – old bunkers, KGB headquarters, Occupation Museums.

Part of my typical trip research is to watch documentaries and movies made in or about the country so I pay a bit more for my Amazon/Netflix/Showtime experience in order to watch obscure cinema. Over the past week I watched The Singing Revolution, a documentary about the culture of song in both countries and how it became part of both country’s resistance leading to independence. Its such a compelling story, I plan on turning it into an article or blog post when I return. And I found a travel show about each country filmed largely in the sunny summer months, which is becoming a re-occurring research theme for this trip.

Stay tuned. If you’re lucky enough to follow my personal Facebook page, that’s where I post while I travel.